Monthly Archives: November 2013

CFP: Data Driven: Digital Humanities in the Library | HASTAC

Call For Conference Proposals

Data Driven: Digital Humanities in the Library

June 20-22 2014, Charleston, SC

Guidelines for Submission
Lightning Round/Paper/Panel deadline: 01 December 2013
Workshop proposal deadline: 01 February 2014

General Information

“Data Driven: Digital Humanities in the Library,” sponsored by the South Carolina Digital Library, the College of Charleston and the Charleston Conference, invites submissions for its 2014 conference, on all aspects of digital humanities in the library. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Digital scholarship
  • Humanities & library collaborations on DH projects
  • GIS and/or data visualization projects
  • Text mining & data analysis
  • Digital humanities librarianship
  • Digital project management
  • Knowledge lifecycle, including production & collaboration
  • Creating or using tools & services for the production, editing and/or analysis of DH data
  • Metadata and linked data in DH

We particularly welcome collaborative panel and paper submissions from librarian and humanities scholar-based teams and/or graduate students. We strongly encourage any proposals relating to the theme of the conference.

CFP: Data Driven: Digital Humanities in the Library | HASTAC.

 

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Filed under Digital Collections, Digital Humanities, Library science, workshop/conference

Showcase Your Undergraduates’ Digital Work at Re:Humanities – ProfHacker – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Showcase Your Undergraduates’ Digital Work at Re:Humanities – ProfHacker – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

This is an excellent example of what the digital humanities can offer undergraduate humanities students: the opportunity to participate in real knowledge-making through a peer-reviewed channel–an opportunity not usually offered to humanities undergraduates. This contributes to a long-needed shift in thinking in the humanities, in which peer-review and publication were reserved for the graduate student or Ph.D.  It also provides the opportunity to accomplish real work in cooperation with others.

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Filed under Digital Humanities, liberal arts colleges, open access, public access, undergraduate instruction, workshop/conference

Finding Life After Academia — and Not Feeling Bad About It – NYTimes.com

Finding Life After Academia — and Not Feeling Bad About It – NYTimes.com.

The market in my field (eighteenth and nineteenth century British Lit) is very poor this year. Fortunately I am also able to market myself as a digital humanist. My ideal job would be a dual hire in which I teach in my area plus work on creating digital collections. I do have programming and statistical skills,  so I can do some of the big data projects; but my heart is really in creating digital collections and digital tools to help scholars have access to materials that are otherwise inaccessible. My  dream project would be to be part of digitizing the George Eliot-Henry Lewes collection at the Dr. Williams Library in London.  They were known to be inveterate annotators of their books, and to have the annotations available digitally would be a great boon to Eliot-Lewes scholars.

But right now I am feeling oppressed by the terrible job market, and the necessity of marketing myself. Academics are already prone to suffer from imposter syndrome, and being on the job market only exacerbates this feeling for me. I still also feel that after nearly ten years in grad school, I “should” try to get a “real” academic job first (i.e. tenure track assistant professor in my field), before looking for alternate careers. So even though I embrace alt-ac and digital humanities, I still feel that it is the consolation prize for those who don’t make it in academia. So mea culpa, and I will try to keep my emotions in line with my stated beliefs and commitments.

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The Shelley-Godwin Archive

The Shelley-Godwin Archive.

The Frankenstein manuscript comes alive in this digital archive!!

THIS is what the digital humanities is about, in my opinion. Big data is important, yes; but what really jazzes me is when materials that have been hidden away in museums and libraries make their public appearance in ways that are beautiful, useful, and open access!

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Filed under Digital Collections, Digital Humanities, digital surrogate